Posts Tagged ‘winter’

6 Ways to Keep Your Dog Safe This Winter!

Friday, February 7th, 2014

We had our second snowfall of the Winter today here in Washington and thought this was a perfect article for today! Hope you all have a wonderful weekend!

winter dogs

 

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Top 10 Ski Resorts-West Coast

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

Top 10 Ski Resorts

Are you doing any skiing or snowboarding this winter? City Dog Magazine has a great list of the Top 10 Ski Resorts focusing on the west coast and with your canine companion in mind!

Written by Craig Romano | Photo by Keoki Flagg

1. Whistler Blackcomb, British Columbia
With its diverse terrain, multitude of trails, immense area, mile-high vertical drop, and wide array of après ski amenities, you’ll be hard-pressed finding a ski resort grander than Canada’s Whistler Blackcomb. No surprise either that this top notch winter sports destination has been chosen to host the 2010 Winter Olympic Ski venues. What may surprise you however is that Whistler is perhaps the dog friendliest resort in the west as well! In fact, it’s the top dog when it comes to doggie catering ski resorts.

According to Tourism Whistler, “nearly 10,000 people live in Whistler and almost all of them have dogs. Whistler is not only pet friendly, its dog crazy!” And more than a handful of village accommodations are more than happy to host you and your hound. Even the posh Fairmont welcomes dogs. And some lodges really welcome them. When your pup checks in at the Crystal Lodge, she’ll be treated to her own bed, blanket, towel, and welcome biscuit.

2. Sun Peaks Resort, British Columbia
Just north of Kamloops in British Columbia’s interior, plenty of powder snow and ample sunshine await you at the Sun Peaks Resort. With over 120 trails on three mountains, Sun Peaks boasts having the third largest skiable terrain in all of Canada. And you can bring ole Yeller out cross-country skiing with you here. The Nordic Center’s long and scenic McGillivray Lake Trail is open to dogs.
According to Ashley Tait, Director of Communications at the resort, Sun Peaks has a wide selection of pet-friendly accommodations including the stylish Delta Sun Peaks Resort in the main village center. At the Delta, visiting dogs are given special treatment-from a friendly welcome to a package of gourmet dog treats to specially designed pet-friendly rooms. “As someone who has stayed at the Delta with my own two large dogs,” states Ashley, “I can honestly say the rooms are especially provided for guests traveling with their furry companions-and the rooms are gorgeous.”

3. Fernie Alpine Ski Resort, British Columbia
Out in the Canadian Rockies, your snowbound hound will feel welcomed as well, especially at the Fernie Alpine Resort. Of course you’ll enjoy Fernie too; being that this former-mining-town-turned-outdoor-recreation-haven was recently named number five in Skiing magazine’s listing of the Top 25 Resorts in North America. The Fernie Lodging Company offers dog-friendly suites in both its slopeside lodges, Snow Creek and Timberline. Now while your snow munching German shepherd will have to sit out while you take to the slopes he may be comforted to know that some of his four-legged brethren are busy working on the mountain. Fernie is the home to a number of CARDA(Canadian Avalanche Rescue Dog Association) training dogs. Maybe you’ll be able to meet rescue dog Keno while visiting. Several winters ago Keno saved the life of a lift operator who was buried for twenty minutes under avalanche snow.

4. Crystal Mountain, Washington 
Washington’s largest downhill ski resort, Crystal offers good cross-country skiing and snowshoeing as well. Every Saturday the resort offers guided snowshoe tours into Silver Basin, a beautiful backcountry area. A tasty fondue dinner is served in the base area lodge after the tour. Your intrepid pup is invited to accompany you whether he fancies to fondue or not. Call 360.663.3040 to reserve your spot. For cozy accommodations for you and your cuddly Chesapeake Bay retriever consider one of Mount Rainier Vacation Rental’s cozy cabins (mtrainiervacationrentals.com).

5. Mount Baker Ski Area, Washington
The Northwest’s snowiest ski area, Mount Baker offers some of the best terrain around. But what about your husky; will he find Baker to his liking? According to marketing director Amy Trowbridge who owns a schnauzer, he should. Amy’s dad, ski area manager, Duncan Howat had his trusty border collie, Jojo by his side for many years while on the job. “Jojo was legendary,” she says. “He practically ran the ski area!” Amy adds, “People love bringing their dogs here and we love seeing them out playing around. They’re allowed in the backcountry ski and snowshoeing area and they’re welcome around the main base area if well-behaved.”
The little burg of Glacier at the base of Mount Baker is a huge dog town according to Trowbridge. Dog-friendly accommodations there include the pleasant Glacier Creek Lodge and cozy Mount Baker View Guest House.

6. Methow Valley, Washington
With over 200 kilometers of groomed and interconnected trails, the Methow Valley in Washington’s OkanoganCounty boasts the second largest Nordic ski trail network in America. A myriad of trails tie the communities of Winthrop, Twisp, and Mazama with adjacent preserves, ranches and national forest lands offering skiers varied terrain amidst outstanding scenery. Maintaining these trails is the Methow Valley Trails Association; and like a growing number of other Nordic ski associations, they’ve opened a handful of trails to dog accompanying skiers. Currently three trails (Lunachick, Big Valley, and you gotta love this one, Cougar Bait) totaling 13.5 kilometers are dog-friendly. And there’s no shortage of dog-friendly lodging in the valley ranging from economical in Twisp; TheBlue Spruce and Idle-A-While, to fancier in Winthrop; the Virginian and Cascade Inn.

7. Mount Bachelor, Oregon
Blessed with ample sunshine and snowfall, Oregon’s Mount Bachelor offers some of the best skiing in the northwest. In the shadow of the volcano’s excellent downhill runs are some mighty fine Nordic ski trails as well. TheMount Bachelor Ski Resort maintains over 50 kilometers of groomed trails where you can find some open to your winter wonderland weimaraner. There is no shortage of dog-friendly lodging in nearby Bend. But one of your better options is to stay at Sunriver just south of Bachelor. Here you can choose from a multitude of cabins and condos in this pet-friendly resort. (If you want to read more about Sunriver, check out our full article here.)

8. Diamond Lake, Oregon
Dogs may not be allowed on Crater Lake National Park’s ski trails, but at nearby Diamond Lake they’re warmly welcomed. The rustic resort high in the Central Cascades has over 10 kilometers of groomed and 75 kilometers ofungroomed cross-country and snow shoeing trails. And your intrepid setter is allowed on nearly all of them. She’s welcome to spend the night with you too, in the resort’s main lodge or cabins.

9. Squaw Valley USA, California
Like Whistler, the village at Squaw Valley at Lake Tahoe is a bone-a-fide dog town! A wide array of lodges at Squaw welcomes your pooch and they’re even allowed to ride the gondola during the summer months. In South Lake Tahoe you can take your buddy on a sleigh ride with you. At the Hope Valley Cross Country Ski Center south of Tahoe, you and your pooch can go schussing together. And on the north shore, Tahoe City’s Tahoe XC has 8 kilometers of dog-friendly trails. A number of dog-friendly lodges can be found in the Lake Tahoe area; Fireside Lodge and the Inn at Heavenly among them. Four-legged guests are often provided with their own bed, water bowl, feed bowls, treats, and toys at these accommodations.

10. Sun Valley, Idaho
One of the oldest and swankiest ski resorts in the west, Sun Valley is quite popular with the fur wearing sect; and not just the two-legged ones. Over a decade ago the North Valley Trail System began allowing dogs on their groomed ski trails, becoming one of the first Nordic Ski Centers in the country to do so. And they didn’t just designate a trail or two; they devoted an entire 30 kilometers worth over to the dogs. A wise decision indeed for today, over 50% of North Valley’s skiers take their dogs along with them. Sun Valley continues to expand its dog-friendly terrain with over 70 kilometers of the North Valley-Woods River-Galena Lodge trail network currently open to them.

Source: http://www.citydogmagazine.com/travel-and-lving/travel/top-tens/item/77-top-10-ski-resorts
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Winter Issues in Your Pets-Revival Animal

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

Although we have had a surprisingly calm Winter here in Washington, other locations have had more extreme climates. We want to make sure you are all staying safe out there and keeping you informed on some issues that arise with the cold Winter months.

Preventing Winter Issues in Your Pets

As we get into the heart of winter, sometimes it’s good to remind ourselves of some of the problems our pets face during the cold winter months. Some dogs and cats need minimal care, while others don’t fare well at all. A little prevention can make winter easier for both you and your pets!

Shedding

For pets that spend more time inside during the winter, the indoor heat can take its toll on their skin and coat. It causes moisture loss and dry skin, resulting in uncomfortable itching. Their winter coat also becomes too much for them, and they’ll start shedding to get comfortable again – the reason why many people feel their pet has been shedding all winter.

Coat strippers help remove the dead hair coat without damaging the remaining coat – they’re excellent for those double-coated dogs with a winter coat that wants to mat. Mars Coat Strippers will remove dead hair mats with little pulling of the skin. The result is a fluffed-up coat that keeps them warm outside and breathes on the inside, which lets your pet be more comfortable in all temperatures.

Once the dead hair is removed, bathing helps clean the skin and replace the lost oils and moisture. Many forget that some dogs are itchy just from the winter grime of everyday living, so bathing is important for healthy breathing skin.VET BASICS® Oatmeal Protein Shampoo replaces winter moisture loss while cleaning the winter grime from the skin and coat. You know your dog’s coat: if you feel you have an extra dry coat, use a cream rinse such as Fresh ‘N Clean® or Premier Cream Rinse every 2 weeks to rejuvenate the coat. Cream rinses help the coat repel moisture and ice, so they’re great for dogs that spend time outside. They’re most helpful when used in the cold of winter and in the hot summer sun.

Nail Care

Rough ground and surfaces help wear down your pet’s nails naturally, so it’s easy to rely on nature to trim your pet’s nails during the summer. However, nail trimming is often forgotten during the winter, which results in long nails that tend to break or crack, causing pain.

Foot restraint is a submissive problem for pets, and many are uncomfortable with it. Before you trim for the first time, rub and massage their feet when pets are relaxed to let them know that it’s okay to let you restrain their feet. Start slow until you and your pet are comfortable. The Oster® Gentle Paws is perfect for the novice nail trimmer – it’s essentially a powered emery board. It won’t let the nail get too short, and dogs like the sanding effect, which won’t twist the nail like clipping sometimes does. Before touching the nail, rub the leg and paw with the trimmer running so they get used to the quiet sound. Once they calm down, you can trim one nail at a time while speaking softly – they should respond in kind.

Ear Care

Ears build up more waxy material in the winter because the skin is trying to replace the lost oils. Clean the ear canal at least twice a month to avoid issues. Check the ear canal and put a small amount of Doc Roy’s® EAR CLEANSER, rub gently, then wipe with a soft tissue or cotton ball. If the ear is infected or irritated, clean the ear several times, then daily until resolved. Most ear infections can be cured with daily cleaning if they are caught early.

Skin & Coat Care

Some dogs also need inside-out support for skin and coat care. Fatty acid supplements such as Doc Roy’s® TRI OMEGA 3 are helpful for preventing cracking and replacing the oils of the skin from the inside out. Omega 3 has anti-inflammatory effects that help with joint and pad trauma while Omega 6 will keep the tissue soft and the pad pliable. Both keep trauma, ulcer and deep pad cracks in check.

The footpad is actually a huge, thick callus that heals quickly with care. Salt and snow melts dry out the pad, causing cracking and licking. Be sure to wash winter ice melt off your dog’s feet and apply a moisturizer. If repair is needed, use Mega-Tek Pet Rebuilder. Mega-Tek will moisturize and heal the chemical damage. House dogs usually need boots or socks to prevent excessive licking and chewing of the pad. Children’s socks work, but one warning. This year I put 4 socks on our dog, and when she ventured from carpet to hardwood floors, feet went everywhere! She did learn to handle it quickly, but it was the funniest thing she has done in her 9 years.

Joint Care

Feet problems are common in winter and surprisingly, most are arthritis-driven. Sore joints will cause limping and poor foot placement, which increases trauma to a pad. Oral glucosamine and chondroitin, such as Doc Roy’s® ACHES AWAY, will increase the joint fluid, easing fatigue and trauma. The result of both is a pad and joint system that will give to the concussion trauma of running. Pain-free running will keep your dog placing their feet correctly, which decreases the wear on their joints.

As a veterinarian, it is ironic that I’ve had to deal with every one of these problems in my own pets, but that just means they could happen to anyone. Preventing winter issues on the outside and the inside out as well as appropriate shampoo has made winter easier for us. A few of these prevention practices can keep your pet healthy and feeling good all winter long.

Source: http://www.revivalanimal.com/articles/winter-issues.html

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Preventing Winter Issues in Your Pets

Monday, December 9th, 2013

The weather is starting to cool down here in Washington as I’m sure it is in your hometown, so we want to make sure you all are prepped for the cold months ahead. There are many problems that arise when the weather gets colder and Revival Animal Health has a great article on some of the issues associated with Winter. We hope you all had a wonderful weekend. Stay warm!

Shedding

For pets that spend more time inside during the winter, the indoor heat can take its toll on their skin and coat. It causes moisture loss and dry skin, resulting in uncomfortable itching. Their winter coat also becomes too much for them, and they’ll start shedding to get comfortable again – the reason why many people feel their pet has been shedding all winter.

Coat strippers help remove the dead hair coat without damaging the remaining coat – they’re excellent for those double-coated dogs with a winter coat that wants to mat. Mars Coat Strippers will remove dead hair mats with little pulling of the skin. The result is a fluffed-up coat that keeps them warm outside and breathes on the inside, which lets your pet be more comfortable in all temperatures.

Once the dead hair is removed, bathing helps clean the skin and replace the lost oils and moisture. Many forget that some dogs are itchy just from the winter grime of everyday living, so bathing is important for healthy breathing skin.VET BASICS® Oatmeal Protein Shampoo replaces winter moisture loss while cleaning the winter grime from the skin and coat. You know your dog’s coat: if you feel you have an extra dry coat, use a cream rinse such as Fresh ‘N Clean® or Premier Cream Rinse every 2 weeks to rejuvenate the coat. Cream rinses help the coat repel moisture and ice, so they’re great for dogs that spend time outside. They’re most helpful when used in the cold of winter and in the hot summer sun.

Nail Care

Rough ground and surfaces help wear down your pet’s nails naturally, so it’s easy to rely on nature to trim your pet’s nails during the summer. However, nail trimming is often forgotten during the winter, which results in long nails that tend to break or crack, causing pain.

Foot restraint is a submissive problem for pets, and many are uncomfortable with it. Before you trim for the first time, rub and massage their feet when pets are relaxed to let them know that it’s okay to let you restrain their feet. Start slow until you and your pet are comfortable. The Oster® Gentle Paws is perfect for the novice nail trimmer – it’s essentially a powered emery board. It won’t let the nail get too short, and dogs like the sanding effect, which won’t twist the nail like clipping sometimes does. Before touching the nail, rub the leg and paw with the trimmer running so they get used to the quiet sound. Once they calm down, you can trim one nail at a time while speaking softly – they should respond in kind.

Ear Care

Ears build up more waxy material in the winter because the skin is trying to replace the lost oils. Clean the ear canal at least twice a month to avoid issues. Check the ear canal and put a small amount of Doc Roy’s® EAR CLEANSER, rub gently, then wipe with a soft tissue or cotton ball. If the ear is infected or irritated, clean the ear several times, then daily until resolved. Most ear infections can be cured with daily cleaning if they are caught early.

Skin & Coat Care

Some dogs also need inside-out support for skin and coat care. Fatty acid supplements such as Doc Roy’s® TRI OMEGA 3 are helpful for preventing cracking and replacing the oils of the skin from the inside out. Omega 3 has anti-inflammatory effects that help with joint and pad trauma while Omega 6 will keep the tissue soft and the pad pliable. Both keep trauma, ulcer and deep pad cracks in check.

The footpad is actually a huge, thick callus that heals quickly with care. Salt and snow melts dry out the pad, causing cracking and licking. Be sure to wash winter ice melt off your dog’s feet and apply a moisturizer. If repair is needed, use Mega-Tek Pet Rebuilder. Mega-Tek will moisturize and heal the chemical damage. House dogs usually need boots or socks to prevent excessive licking and chewing of the pad. Children’s socks work, but one warning. This year I put 4 socks on our dog, and when she ventured from carpet to hardwood floors, feet went everywhere! She did learn to handle it quickly, but it was the funniest thing she has done in her 9 years.

Joint Care

Feet problems are common in winter and surprisingly, most are arthritis-driven. Sore joints will cause limping and poor foot placement, which increases trauma to a pad. Oral glucosamine and chondroitin, such as Doc Roy’s® ACHES AWAY, will increase the joint fluid, easing fatigue and trauma. The result of both is a pad and joint system that will give to the concussion trauma of running. Pain-free running will keep your dog placing their feet correctly, which decreases the wear on their joints.

As a veterinarian, it is ironic that I’ve had to deal with every one of these problems in my own pets, but that just means they could happen to anyone. Preventing winter issues on the outside and the inside out as well as appropriate shampoo has made winter easier for us. A few of these prevention practices can keep your pet healthy and feeling good all winter long.

Source: http://www.revivalanimal.com/articles/winter-issues.html

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Holiday Safety Tips

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

Holiday Safety

The holidays are coming up and it can be a dangerous time for our lovable pets. PetMD.com has a great article on what to be careful of when it comes to prepping for the holiday season.

Christmas Tree Tips:

1. Place your Christmas tree in a corner, blocked off from your pet’s wanting eyes. If this doesn’t keep your dog or cat from attempting to jump onto the tree, you can place aluminum foil, a plastic drink bottle filled with knick knacks, or anything else that creates noise on the tree’s bottom limbs to warn you of an impending tree disaster.

2. Tinsel can add a nice sparkling touch to the tree, but make sure you hang it up out of your pet’s reach. Ingesting the tinsel can potentially block their intestines, which is generally only remedied through surgical means.

3. Do not put lights on the tree’s lower branches. Not only can your pet get tangled up in the lights, they are a burning hazard. Additionally, your dog or cat may inadvertently get shocked by biting through the wire

4. Ornaments need to be kept out of reach, too. In addition to being a choking and intestinal blockage hazard, shards from broken ornaments may injure paws, mouths, or other parts of your pet’s body.

5. For those buying a live Christmas trees this year, keep the area free and clear of pine needles. While they may not seem dangerous, the needles can puncture your pet’s intestines if ingested.

Other Great Holiday Item Tips:

1. Did you know holly, mistletoe, and poinsettia plants are poisonous to dogs or cats? If you normally use these plants to decorate your home, they should be kept in an area your pet cannot reach.

2. Edible tree decorations — whether they be ornaments, or cranberry or popcorn strings — are like time bombs waiting to happen. These goodies are just too enticing and your pet will surely tug at them, knocking down your wonderfully decorated spruce.

3. Burning candles should be placed on high shelves or mantels, out of your pet’s way — there’s no telling where a wagging tail may end up. Homes with fireplaces should use screens to avoid accidental burns.

4. To prevent any accidental electrocutions, any exposed indoor or outdoor wires should be taped to the wall or the sides of the house.

5. When gift wrapping, be sure to keep your pet away. Wrapping paper, string, plastic, or cloth could cause intestinal blockages. Scissors are another hazard, and they should be kept off floors or low tables.

We at petMD don’t want to ruin all your holiday decorating fun. By all means, go crazy sprucing up your home and wrapping presents. But make sure you do in a way that is safe for your pet(s) this holiday season.

Source: http://www.petmd.com/dog/seasonal/evr_multi_christmas_safety#.UqDwNMRDvCI

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Top 10 Winter Retreats With Your Dog

Monday, November 11th, 2013

City Dog Magazine is a dog magazine that focuses on the Pacific Northwest (Seattle, Portland, San Francisco) so this is a great source of information and articles for our local families out there! With Winter creeping up, what better way to enjoy it than with your furry friend? City Dog Magazine lists their Top 10 Winter Retreats in the Northwest. Hope you all are having a wonderful Monday!

1-Percy in AZ snow

1. Quinault Rainforest, Olympic Peninsula, Washington
What better time to explore the rainforest than when it’s raining? And rain is what it does on the west slopes of the Olympic Peninsula, one of the few places on the planet that’s home to temperate rainforests. While the Olympic National Park is off limits to your water loving Lab, the trails of the Olympic National Forest are not. Take your buddy out for a walk on one of the fine trails near the south shore of Lake Quinault. Admire towering trees that were old when Lewis and Clark came to the Pacific Northwest. And after the two of you have had enough raindrops falling on your heads, hunker down for the evening in a cozy lodge; you in a comfy chair, your furry buddy on a cushy rug in front of a warm and drying fire. The Lake Quinault Lodge (visitlakequinault.com) offers dog-friendly rooms and out-the-door access to trails and the magnificent rainforest.

2. Pacific Beach, Washington
Just south of the Olympic Rainforests and north of bustling Ocean Shores are the quaint and quiet communities of Pacific Beach, Moclips and Seabrook. You won’t find rows of restaurants, casinos or shops here. The main attraction is the beach. And in winter a procession of storms rolling off of the surf adds an intense and stunning score. Don’t miss it! A slew of dog-accommodating cottages and lodges in these beach towns (pacificbeachwa.com/lodging.htm) welcome you and your retriever to settle in and watch the waves roll in. Of course in between the stunning storms you may want to get out and walk, run or saunter along the area’s wide sandy beaches. Looking for a fine dining experience? Consider the Ocean Crest Resort (oceancrestresort.com), a coastal Washington institution. And your dog is welcome in some of their cozy rooms.

3. Cannon Beach, Oregon
One of the finest and most popular beaches in the Pacific Northwest, everything that makes Cannon Beach a hit in summer applies to winter visiting as well. Miles of spectacular shoreline, all public and all open to you and your sand-sniffing setter spread north and south from this artsy resort town. Watch storm-charged breakers bash Haystack Rock, Cannon’s 235-foot signature sea stack and quite possibly the most recognized natural feature along the entire Oregon Coast. Take a hike through Ecola State Park through salty maritime forests to a series of high bluffs for supreme storm watching. Cannon Beach (cannonbeach.org) has plenty of dog-friendly lodging options including the elegant Hallmark (hallmarkinns.com) and Surfsand Resorts (surfsand.com).  The latter greets your buddy with a pet basket upon arrival.

4. Crescent City, California
Northern California has no shortages of great beach towns for winter walking and storm watching too. And Crescent City in Del Norte County along the Redwood Coast makes for a great off-the-beaten path destination. While the trails of Redwood National Park and the adjacent Redwood State Parks are off-limits to your curious canine, two fine Redwood Coast beaches welcome them (leashes required). Head a few miles south to Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park’s Gold Bluffs Beach or to Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park’s Crescent Beach located just minutes outside of Crescent City. Frolic on wide sandy beaches beneath towering bluffs sporting humongous ancient redwoods, firs and spruce. When it’s time to dry out, warm-up and settle in for the night, head back to town where a number of hotels including the Quality Inn and Suites Redwood Coast are dog-friendly.

5. Huntington Beach, California
If the rain is something you wish to leave behind, then perhaps a retreat in sunny Southern California is more in order for you and your storm-shy Basenji. Consider Huntington Beach. “Surf City USA” is more than just a good place for rain-ridden Northwesterners to soak up sunshine; it’s a bone-a-fide dog-friendly community. Within the city’s eight miles of some of the finest beaches in southern California, is Dog Beach. Here your surf-sniffing buddy has over one mile of wide sandy beach to run, dig, fetch and splash—unleashed! Afterwards the two of you can walk or jog along the city’s miles of trails. When it’s time for some grub, head to Huntington Beach’s Central Park where you’ll find the renowned Park Bench Café (parkbenchcafe.com) with its doggie dining area and canine cuisine menu. It’s one of the dog-friendliest restaurants in the west. And when it’s time to retire for the evening choose from many dog-friendly hotels, including the oceanfront Hilton Waterfront Beach Resort.

6. Palm Springs, California
Prefer a little more warmth with your sunshine? Shun the seashore for the desert and head to Palm Springs where you and your Pomeranian can be pampered with winter warmth. Soak up the desert sun while strolling down Palm Canyon Drive. The area boasts several fine dog parks including one off of Civic Drive sporting old-school fire hydrants. The Civic Center Dog Park has separate areas for big and small dogs and is lit until 11 pm allowing the two of you to enjoy a refreshing desert night. And if you prefer to experience some desert wilderness, head to the nearby San Bernardino National Forest and the Salton Sea State Recreation Area for good hiking and camping options.

7. Lake Tahoe, California
If it’s a winter wonderland you desire, head to the mountains of Lake Tahoe. Here you and your snowbound hound will have no shortage of snug lakeside and mountain cabins and condos to choose from—and miles of snow blanketed terrain to ski and snowshoe across. Squaw Valley (squaw.com) is one of the dog-friendliest ski villages in the west. If you’re ready to play in the snow in the form of cross-country skiing you can bring along your buddy at Tahoe City’s Tahoe XC (tahoexc.org) and Hope Valley’s Cross Country Ski Center (hopevalleyoutdoors.com).

8. Methow Valley, Washington
One of the finest places for dog-friendly cross-country skiing, and just a few hours away from Seattle is the Methow Valley. Located on the east slope of the Cascades where the sun shines liberally throughout the year, you’ll find over 200 kilometers of groomed and interconnected ski trails here. An active association (mvsta.com) maintains these trails that weave through forest and farmland and tie together the communities of Winthrop, Twisp and Mazama. A growing number of these trails allow your dog to tag along while you’re making tracks. And when it’s time to bed down for the evening choose from among a wide array of dog-friendly lodging options in the valley ranging from the economical Blue Spruce in Twisp to the centrally located and cozy Winthrop Inn (winthropinn.com).

9. Klamath Falls, Oregon
If it’s all out adventuring you desire for you and your snow loving husky, head to Klamath Falls in south central Oregon. Here abutting the Upper Klamath National Wildlife Refuge you’ll find the Crystal Wood Lodge (crystalwoodlodge.com) billed as Southern Oregon’s Premier Pet-Friendly Destination. Aside from catering to dogs with dog bedding in the lodge’s rooms, dog-washing facilities, and a doggie-day care, are five miles of dog-friendly hiking trails perfect for traversing the property’s scenic 130-acres. Home to Briar’s Patch Sled Dogs, you can go on a dog sledding adventure led by a musher and dog team that competed in the Iditarod.

10. Victoria, British Columbia
If your winter retreat plans call for more urban sophistication, look no farther than beautiful Victoria, on British Columbia’s spectacular Vancouver Island. Quaint and cultured and welcoming to travelers with both two and four legs you’ll find plenty to do here during the long winter months. The city has two off-leash beaches where your buddy can frolic along a scenic shoreline while you take in sweeping views of the snow-capped Olympic Mountains in the distance. As a result of its recently launched Paws in the Parks program, Victoria now contains over a half dozen off-leash parks (victoria.ca/dogs) for the two of you to sample. And with leash your pooch can take to several miles of well-groomed trails in close-to-downtown Beacon Hill Park or several large outlying regional parks like the one in East Sooke. You’ll find no shortage of dog-friendly accommodations and your buddy will have no trouble meeting a few new friends (both human and furry) within this historic and charming city.

2-Ollie in the snow

Source: http://www.citydogmagazine.com/travel-and-lving/travel/top-tens/item/75-top-10-winter-retreats

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